Monday, January 30, 2017

Bonsai Master Masashi Hirao | Bonsai Project


The word 'Bon-sai' is a Japanese term which, literally means "planted in a container" when translated. Since i was a little curious about where the art of Bonsai came from, i managed to do a little research on the beauty of it. Apparently, it all started when the Japanese decided to develop the art of Bonsai along the influence of Zen Buddhism which has been around for over a thousand years. The goal to growing a Bonsai is usually to create miniaturized but realistic representation of nature in the form of a tree, and personally speaking, it really takes a lot of passion and patience to create such art.


In fact, a thousand years ago, there is a Japanese passage saying "a tree that is left growing in its natural state is a crude thing. It is only when it is kept close to human beings who fashion it with loving care that its shape and style acquire the ability to move one". From the saying, it actually projects a lot of deep meanings about how we should care about the existence of life. If you agree with me, you'd be excited to know more about Masashi Hirao, a.k.a the Bonsai Master, has a Bonsai Project coming up, where he shares his love and passion to the art of zen featuring the Bonsai


From a personal experience, i've never really appreciated the art of Bonsai till i visited Japan about 5 years back. Japan is home to the world's most beautiful Bonsai trees, and i would highly say that its a place to visit at least once in a lifetime because the quality of the Bonsai's in their famous Japanese gardens are usually overwhelming. And believe me, the minute you step in a Japanese garden with Bonsai, its as if you've step into a small part of heaven.

Masashi Hirao creating his masterpiece

Given the privilege to be aware, about Masashi Hirao whereabouts, im here to share with you about his Bonsai Project which will be featured on RTM1 on February 4th, 11th, 18th, and 25th from 2pm to 3pm. So if you would like to know more about Masashi Hirao's Bonsai Project, be sure to check out RTM1 on the dates given, as this would be a once in a lifetime opportunity to be able to see how Bonsai art is created by sitting down right in front of your tv screen.



So what are you waiting for? Set your pre-recording on astro, if youre watching on astro, or alternatively, you can also set a reminder on your phone to be sure that you wont miss out on this exciting show. Psst, hover over "Masashi Hirao" to redirect yourself to his official youtube page to see some of his beautiful creations. And let me warn you that after watching the video's, you may have the urge to own your very own Bonsai tree too. But oh well, i guess theres no harm to that right?hehe. Well, thats all for now. Do also stay tuned on my next blogpost on the Bonsai Project as i will be sharing my views on the show. Thank you for reading my blogpost, and im hoping that you're looking forward to the show! xx

BONSAI PROJECT | RTM1 | 4th, 11th, 18th, 25th February 2017 | 2pm-3pm


7 comments:

  1. I have always admired bonsai but never bothered to read up about them. Your post has certainly helped fill in the blanks that I have about bonsai. Thanks for doing all the research!

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  2. Wow this is super good, I wish I got the time to visit when I m in Tokyo later this month.

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  3. I have a few Bonsai around my garden and they are absolutely beautiful. Though this share gives more in-depth info about them :) Cheers Aliza dear.

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  4. My house have a few Bonsai and it's quite easy to take care of them.

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  5. wow this looks amazing!! i have a few bonsai at home too, hope to trim them till such lovely shape too

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  6. i never appreciated the art either.. must be interesting... looking forward to your review of the show on your next post!

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  7. I've watched an episode in NHK world about the art of bonsai making, and I feel jaw dropped for its beauty. When I visit Japan, I will include this to my itinerary.

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